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Quantifying segregation on a small scale: how and where locality determines student compositions and outcomes taking Hamburg, Germany, as an example

Resource type
Journal Article
Authors/contributors
Title
Quantifying segregation on a small scale: how and where locality determines student compositions and outcomes taking Hamburg, Germany, as an example
Abstract
Increased social and academic segregation are known side effects of school choice policies in market-driven environments that facilitate competition amongst schools. Aiming at complementing foundational knowledge in quantifying segregation, this study first defines school markets (i.e., geographical context) based on student transitions from primary school to secondary school in Hamburg, Germany. Second, genuine spatial measures of segregation are applied to generate differentiated in-situ insights. In general, social segregation appears evident between school markets, school types, and individual schools and, thus, shapes social compositions of secondary schools. The pattern of student transfers across the city confirms that parents are selecting particular schools for their children, resulting in different schools servicing different composition of students and so markets. Furthermore, the findings suggest that school markets in both very affluent and very deprived areas are spatially isolated and hence persistently reproduce wealth and affluence as well as poverty and disadvantage.
Publication
School Effectiveness and School Improvement
Volume
31
Issue
3
Pages
356-380
Date
July 2, 2020
ISSN
0924-3453
Short Title
Quantifying segregation on a small scale
Accessed
07/03/2021, 17:19
Library Catalog
Taylor and Francis+NEJM
Extra
Publisher: Routledge _eprint: https://doi.org/10.1080/09243453.2019.1688845
Citation
Leist, S. A., & Perry, L. B. (2020). Quantifying segregation on a small scale: how and where locality determines student compositions and outcomes taking Hamburg, Germany, as an example. School Effectiveness and School Improvement, 31(3), 356–380. https://doi.org/10.1080/09243453.2019.1688845