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You use! I use! We use! Questioning the Orthodoxy of One-to-One Computing in Primary Schools

Resource type
Journal Article
Author/contributor
Title
You use! I use! We use! Questioning the Orthodoxy of One-to-One Computing in Primary Schools
Abstract
The current orthodoxy regarding computer use in schools appears to be that one-to-one (1:1) computing, wherein each child owns or has sole access to a computing device, is the most efficacious way to achieve a range of desirable educational outcomes, including individualised learning, collaborative environments, or constructivist pedagogies. This article challenges this notion, suggesting instead that 1:2 computing is an appropriate means of achieving such aims in primary school. It further suggests that 1:2 computing is preferable to 1:1 computing to achieve a balance between productivity, student engagement, social activity, and individualised learning. This article draws on data collected during the 2009 school year from four Year 7 classrooms (11- to 13-year-old students) with varied patterns of access to netbook computers. The researcher collected detailed information from two pieces of software installed in each computer and analysed the data through an Activity Theory conceptual and methodological lens. Recommendations from this research will assist school leaders in making informed decisions regarding 1:1 and 1:2 computing.
Publication
Journal of Research on Technology in Education
Volume
44
Issue
2
Pages
101-120
Date
December 1, 2011
ISSN
1539-1523
Accessed
01/05/2015, 18:11
Library Catalogue
Taylor and Francis+NEJM
Citation
Larkin, K. (2011). You use! I use! We use! Questioning the Orthodoxy of One-to-One Computing in Primary Schools. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 44(2), 101–120. https://doi.org/10.1080/15391523.2011.10782581